The Form Crash Course

Form: it's a gorilla sitting on your chest and it's time to politely ask him to remove himself. Figuring out your own form is equal parts exciting / torture / magic. It's a slow process that is easiest learned or unlearned in very slow and controlled movements. Get one part working at a snail's pace and then try to add just a snail's pace + 1 to it.

Let yourself off the hook completely on where the disc will go. As you change your form, the disc will do what it does. Eventually it'll go where you want it to, but during a form retooling - you're often focused on doing ONE thing right. So from the outset, let yourself know that the disc flying where you want it to is not even an issue.

Get your phone or camera out and figure out how to record yourself. And "I don't have a tripod" is no excuse. Most phones these days take great video, so get proficient at shooting, reviewing, deleting.

You can rubber band this to a tree, pole, basket.
The following are just the highlight posts that were the biggest turning points for my own form. I've certainly written more, but these are the big ideas that helped me along my path. I hope they help you.

Backhand Form


  1. The Magic of Slowing Down the Beto Drill: Let's Go
  2. Bracing Break-Through: Let's Go
  3. Why We Brace: Let's Go
  4. Core Concepts: Let's Go
  5. Core Concepts Part 2: Let's Go
  6. Elbow Extension (Elbow Smack): Let's Go
  7. Slow Down To Throw Far: Let's Go
  8. Connecting to the Ground: Let's Go
  9. Instep and Hips: Let's Go
  10. Get your heal off the ground: Let's Go

Technique and Practice


  1. Hyzer, Flat or Anhyzer? Let's Go
  2. Distance Trouble Shooting Checklist : Let's Go
  3. Learning your game: Let's Go
  4. Analyzing the EO 2013 Lead Card: Let's Go
  5. Patience: Probably as important as any technique that I've worked on.

4 comments:

  1. Hi. Great site you have here. I've got so-so forehand form but *horrendous* backhand form. So basically I only throw forehand. Do you have any suggestions as to a starting point for someone looking to build up decent BH form from scratch.

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    Replies
    1. Mike, I guess it depends on what "horrendous" really is. I believe that there's an initial amount of time that has to to got into being able to be athletic with the backhand. Meaning, if somebody is a complete beginner - and not throwing 250' flat yet, then I'd say getting out regularly and just learning to throw, even at the fundamental level is key.

      Trying to fix form requires that at you can actually alter the motion and have that control. Once you've got the bare bones down and can put the disc where you want, I'd go through these articles and pickup whatever makes sense for where you're at.

      My focus is always: smooth, loose, balanced.

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  2. Thanks for your reply! Previously I've tried learning the BH drive by throwing putters using the right pec drill, but they usually go nose up to the right and travel only about 100-125 feet. Meanwhile you make the drill look so easy! I thought the right pec drill, as it's so compact, would be a good means for learning the drive. But for me, it hasn't worked well.

    Going forward, I was thinking I may want to build up competence with BH approaches and then add nose down flight, longer reach back, and eventually an x-step in order to piece together a BH drive. I've been anything but smooth, loose and balanced in my prior right pec practice, but I think I'd have more luck in implementing these keys with approach shots. What do you think?

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  3. How about a crash course in the forehand?

    ReplyDelete